RECIPE: It’s Pastis o’Clock Somewhere- 5 Popular Drink Recipes That Will Transport You to the South of France

I don’t know about you, but this week, in another episode of ‘Pretending We’re Traveling the World While We Sit Home in Our Sweatpants,‘ I’m still mentally somewhere on the French Riviera. Sticking with the theme of Grace Kelly as The Wilsons in Wanderland Book Club finishes up reading Meet Me in Monaco, my plan for this Friday night is to watch ‘To Catch a Thief,’ trying to trick myself into thinking I’m in Europe, all while sipping on a French 75.

Here are 5 popular drink recipes that will allow you to trick yourself into believing you’ve come along to the French Riviera with me!

Spritz

The Aperol Spritz is a highly-coveted Venetian aperitif that is wildly popular not only in Italy, but in the South of France as well. It’s easy to make, using equal parts Aperol and Prosecco, with a splash of carbonated water, and an orange slice as a garnish (I like to squeeze some fresh orange juice into my drink as well). Aperol is similar to Campari in its bitterness but is overall lighter, sweeter and less potent. While a staple in the 1920’s and 1930’s, Aperol has had a bit of resurgence over the last decade, where it has become rather trendy worldwide, these days you’ll see them being enjoyed at restaurants and bars across the world.

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 oz. Aperol
  • 3 oz. Prosecco
  • Splash of club soda
  • Orange slice for garnishing

French 75

Though the name would suggest it originated in France, The French 75 – sometimes known as the 75 cocktail – was actually created during World War 1 at a bar in Paris, where it was recorded by barman Harry MacElhone in his trusty book of cocktails. The story goes- the drink was so strong that “its kick was the equivalent to being hit by a French 75mm gun,” hence the name. It is made from champagne, gin, lemon juice and sugar, and is equal parts sweet and strong.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 ounces London dry gin
  • ¾ ounce fresh lemon juice
  • ¾ ounce simple syrup
  • 2 ounces Champagne
  • Long spiral lemon twist (for serving)

Perrier Get 27

Dating back to 1796, the aperitif Get 27 was apparently made by the Get brothers in 1796 to become one of France’s most well known “crème de menthe” or mint liqueurs. Because of its French origin, “get” is pronounced “jet,” and the 27 comes from what was the original alcohol content in the drink (it’s now around 21%). It’s predominantly popular in French bars served over ice, but these days, more and more people are enjoying it with with a splash of Perrier, drinking it as a refresher.

INGREDIENTS

  • Get 27
  • Perrier Sparkling Water

Pastis

Pastis, with its anise flavor, much like that of Sambucca and Ouzo, is not for everyone. That is, at least – at first. It can take a few sips, and sometimes even a few drinks (on separate occasions, of course), before it grows on you and your tastebuds align with the charm of pastis.

When served at a French bar or cafe, the bartender will likely pour about an ounce of your pastis brand of your choice (Ricard and Pernod being two of the more popular choices ) into a small, flared glass. A carafe or pitcher of water will be placed next to it, and you may also get a small bowl of ice cubes. Many people in France prefer to drink it room temperature, but there is the option of drinking it nice and cold. You will then add the water (and/or ice) amount of your liking, watching an almost science project-like reaction occur, as the liquid turns cloudy- almost milky- in your glass. This is due to the mixing of the oil in the liqueur, which comes from the anise.

INGREDIENTS

  • Pastis
  • Carbonated Water

The French Riviera

Ok, this drink isn’t technically from France, nor is it even necessarily popular there. It was, however, created by Difford’s Guide with the country in mind, and combines the fresh flavors of apricot preserves that will remind you of a day in Provence, with the tangy taste of cognac and rum, shaken with lemon juice and mint leaves that will make you forget you’re not actually at a seaside cafe in Nice.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 1/3 oz. Cognac VSOP
  • 1/2 oz. Bacardi Gold Rum
  • 1 spoonful Apricot preserves
  • 1/2 oz. freshly-squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/2 oz. Honey Syrup (3 parts honey to 1 part water)
  • 1/3 oz. Simple Syrup
  • Fresh Mint
  • Orange Slice for Garnish

No matter which cocktail and French film you end up pairing together this evening, I bid you santé and bon week-end!

*To Join the Wilsons in Wanderland Book Club, Click Here*

A traveler since childhood, Juliana Fraioli Wilson has always had a love for exploring. She is a published writer and an accomplished business owner with a background in music and art. Join Juliana, her husband Ryan, and their two kids in Wanderland! Follow along as they share tips, tricks, recipes and reviews from some of the most beautiful travel destinations in the world.

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Wilsons in Wanderland

A traveler since childhood, Juliana Fraioli Wilson has always had a love for exploring. She is a published writer and an accomplished business owner with a background in music and art. Join Juliana, her husband Ryan, and their two kids in Wanderland! Follow along as they share tips, tricks, recipes and reviews, from some of the most beautiful travel destinations in the world.

1 Comment

  1. […] week, I posted a list of 5 Popular Drink Recipes That Will Transport You to the South of France, and the first item on it is the ever-popular Spritz. I personally love a spritz made with Campari- […]

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